Monthly Archives: March 2017

5 quick tips on getting enough sleep

Sleep debt adversely affects your health, limits your cognitive function, and results in fatigue, moodiness, impaired memory, and slowed reaction time. Sometimes sleep disorders and chronic stress can cause insomnia. Other times lack of sleep is self-created.  Either way, you won’t feel refreshed and ready for your day without sufficient sleep. 

Here are 5 quick tips on getting enough sleep:

1. Determine how much sleep you really need. The amount of sleep you need depends on various factors, including your age, genetics, and natural rhythm. The sleep duration recommendation by the National Sleep Foundation is 7 to 9 hours, on average, for adults between the ages of 26 and 64. But it’s better to know your individual needs. Pay attention to how the amount of sleep you get affects your wakefulness throughout the day. If you are generally cranky, feel like dozing off when driving, or zone out a lot during meetings, you could be sleep deprived. For a week, such as during a vacation, try waking up without an alarm. You will tend to rise when you’re fully rested.

2. Keep a consistent sleep schedule. Go to bed at a set time, ideally at 10 p.m. (according to sleep experts). Or if you know when you must wake up, set your bedtime based on how much sleep you need. Here’s the basic sleep formula:

  • The average sleep cycle is 90 minutes long
  • A typical night of sleep includes 5 full sleep cycles
  • 90 x 5 = 450 minutes, or 7.5 hours
  • From your wake time, work back 7.5 hours to find your bedtime

Let’s assume you need to be in the office at 8 a.m. It takes 2 hours to complete your morning routine and commute. If you set your wake time at 6 a.m. and count back 7.5 hours, your ideal bedtime is 10:30 p.m. This means you need to be in bed and ready for sleep at that time. Travel, deadlines, family emergencies and unexpected issues can interfere with your sleep schedule, but do what you can to protect it.

3. Do a brain dump. Stress, worry and anxiety make it hard to fall asleep. Try daily mindfulness or meditation to observe racing thoughts without getting hooked by them. Write down unfinished to-do’s and big ideas to keep them from swirling around in your head. Have a plan and set a date for when to tackle them, drop them altogether, or move them to your someday list.

4. Create an evening ritual or routine.  Eat a light dinner a few hours before your bedtime, so you’re not too full or too hungry when you go to sleep. Avoid caffeine and alcohol. Start winding down 45 minutes to 1 hour before you go to sleep. Shut down your electronic devices and keep them away from your bed. If you habitually check your smartphone, nix the mobile alarm app for a zen alarm clock (Now & Zen recommended). Stay away from emails, social media, the Internet, TV, and any type of work during your winding down period. Do gentle yoga, listen to relaxing music, or read uplifting literature.  Turn off the lights, wear a sleep mask (Earth Therapeutics recommended), release tension, and notice your breath as you fall asleep.

5.  Make sleep a priority. In our pseudo-productive environment, it’s tempting to cut sleep short to get more stuff done or to move ahead on a project. But getting enough high-quality sleep is essential to managing your energy and doing focused work. Sleep is more important than food and exercise when it comes to your personal health and productivity. Consult a sleep specialist if you have a sleep disorder or need help developing deeper sleep. Use feng shui to make a sleep sanctuary for yourself.

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Photo by: Rachel